Anti-system parties adapt to opposing forces

The agreement reached between the Greek government, led by the leftwing Syriza coalition, and representatives of Greece’s creditors on August 11th for a third loan to avoid default, following those in 2010 and 2012, increases the chances that Greece will stay in the euro zone, despite uncertainties over whether the government will be able to implement what it has agreed to and as to whether the creditor governments from the rest of the euro zone will be willing at some point to make the debt manageable.

It means that – apart from a significant dissenting minority—the formerly anti-system Syriza has succumbed to the rules of the euro zone. This development can be looked at negatively as the denial of democratic hopes of the Greek people but there is still the chance that the new government can prove to be radical in the Greek context.  It can remodel the administration to work for the public rather than in its own interests or those of privileged clients as has often been the case; it can reform the tax system to enforce payment of taxes, but for this to be possible it will have to ensure that payment of taxes is compatible with Greece’s large number of small businesses thriving and expanding. Despite this proviso it cannot act to reduce inequality. There is still scope to hope that a government not formed of one of the two that have governed Greece since the end of military rule in 1974 will be able to do what the others failed to do, namely transforming the enduring Greek view of the state as opponent of the individual citizen to one of a state serving the citizen.

 

Spain’s Podemos likely to make gains but will also have to compromise

In Spain two new parties, Podemos (We Can) and Ciudadanos (Citizens), will at the end-November elections in similar manner challenge the longstanding hold on power over 30 years of two established parties of centre-right and centre-left.  While Ciudadonos is a centrist party, Podemos is very similar to Syriza, except that Syriza is a coalition of formerly existing small parties, while Podemos has emerged as completely new since the 2008-09 crisis. It achieved considerable breakthroughs when local groups supported by Podemos won sufficient seats on the town councils of Madrid, Barcelona and some other cities, to appoint mayors. The new mayor of Barcelona, the 41-year-old Ana Colau was previously running a campaign group against evictions of families unable to pay mortgages while the new mayor of Madrid, the 71-year-old Manuela Carmena, had in the past been a leading member of a law firm focusing on employment law, who had seem some of her colleagues in the firm assassinated by right wing extremists soon after the restoration of democracy in 1975.

Creditor institutions are now claiming that a Greek recovery was beginning at the time of Syriza’s election victory in January 2015, but any such recovery was highly tentative and had not had any impact on the great majority of the Greek public. The Spanish government of Mariano Rajoy (Popular Party) can point to expected 3% growth this year and half a million extra jobs in the year to mid-2015. The opposition, which includes the traditional socialist party (PSOE) as well as the two new parties, can point to major corruption cases implicating the PP and continuing near 50% youth unemployment. Despite Podemos’ success in major cities, the two new parties, alone or together, are not likely to win the election. But they should become a significant presence at national level and could be part of a coalition of the centre-left.

 

Portugal prepares for a traditional two party contest

Portugal is holding general elections in early October. Remarkably, despite the severe austerity the country has experienced, there is no sign of any increase in support for non-traditional or existing far-left or far-right parties. The elections will be a close contest between the governing parties –the Social Democrats  and  Christian Democrats – which have recently united to fight the election– and the opposition Socialist Party. One reason may be that, despite government cuts and high taxation reducing living standards unemployment at 11% is much lower than the rates of 23% and 25% in Spain and Greece. Another could be that an active and independent judiciary has gone so far as detain the former Socialist prime minister, Jose Socrates, in prison since November 2014 awaiting trial for corruption and Ricardo Salgado, the head of the country’s largest failed bank, Espirito Santo was put under precautionary house arrest in July pending trial on a range of charges connected with his leadership of the bank. The public may therefore not feel the establishment is able to act with impunity.

 

Real change may still be possible

In Greece and Spain, anti-system parties have made gains and are likely to do so again in the November general elections in Spain. But they have been and will continue to have to compromise with internal and external forces they oppose. Even so they bring new energy and challenge vested interests. Some real change could be achieved, although it will fall well short of their ambitions.