Will Tsipiras seize the day?

Despite having abandoned most of the policies on which it been first elected in January and in August agreed with creditors to a programme roundly rejected in a referendum on July 5th, the left wing Syriza emerged as the victor of the September 20th election and is again able to form a governing majority coalition with the centrist Independent Greeks. The traditional centre right New Democracy seemed neck and neck in opinion polls a week earlier but was decisively put into second place. Most surprising a dissident group from Syyriza that rejected the agreement with creditors and called for Greece to leave the euro so that it could run it’s own economic policy did not even achieve the 3% threshold required to be represented in parliament.

The leader of Syriza Alexis Tsipiras, performed his u-turn with grace and has managed to make the Greeks feel better about themselves. Has he achieved anything other than to be re-elected. The answer is no. Will he be able to achieve anything? The answer is that he still might and has a better chance as the head of what is still a new team than the old parties New Democracy and Pasok just because his ministers have had less time to learn bad habits and still have a degree of freshness. Nevertheless all power corrupts and if progress is not quickly made old ways may reassert themselves.

Although the agreement with creditors imposes severe constraints on the new government’s freedom of action it still leaves plenty it can do. It should in no way limit Tsipiras’ ability to tackle corruption and reduce the power of vested interests which he has declared as his priorities. Nor will it prevent him from what must be an ambitious reform of the public administration so that civil servants know their job is to serve the public’s interest not their own and to minimise rather than maximise the burden of bureaucratic procedures on individuals and businesses.

There is however one overriding priority: to make Greeks pay their taxes. Unless they do public services will collapse through lack of funding and the better off will retain their privileges at the expense of the large numbers of unemployed or on very low incomes. Tax receipts have probably fallen during recent months when lack of trust in bank deposits have made Greece into a mainly cash economy. The travails of Greece have still not led to any sense that  paying taxes is one of the obligations of citizenship.

A difficulty is caused by the position e of the richest Greeks are shipping magnates. They were given a particularly favourable tax deal by previous governments in order to attract them to live in Greece and spend money there. This a rational reason but it is still wrong. If rich shipping families are seen to get away with paying little tax other wealthy Greeks will ask way they should and if wealthy Greeks pay little middle range businesses and self employed will ask the same question. Addressing the issue is not easy. The shipping companies have to be treated favourably or they will noticeable to compete with those registered in other countries. This does not prevent fair taxation of the income and wealth of individuals. The individuals of course as to whether they live in Greece or not and even if they do they may try to hide their wealth in tax havens. But international cooperation in tracking down this wealth in places like Switzerland has made considerable progress should seek the advice of countries like the US and Germany which have acted

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