Spain’s Christmas election: what does it mean?

The results of the Spanish election on December 20th are not clear-cut. Four parties, two old –the centre-right Popular Party and centre-left Socialists (PSOE)—and two new, the left wing Podemos (We can) a movement of local groups which grew out of the 2011 street protests by the Indignados at the time that government cutbacks, and the centrist Ciudadanos (Citizens). The new parties have mounted a significant challenge to the old parties, but unlike Greece failed to dislodge them.

 A fragile lefty-wing coalition may emerge

There does appear, however, to be the possibility of a narrow margin in favour of those who want a change of from the PP, a party whose government in the last four years has succeeded, at considerable social cost, in turning round the economy, but whose moral authority has been weakened by the revelation that the party had for a long time ran a dual bookkeeping system, one above board and one for illegal contributions and illegal payouts. The PSOE is also tainted by corruption but mainly in its regional stronghold, Andalusia. Moreover the PSOE leader, Pedro Sanchez, is relatively new and not seen as tainted by past malpractice. The PP leader, Mariano Rajoy, has by contrast been party leader since 2004 and cannot convincingly claim that he new nothing about what was happening, unless by deliberately turning a blind eye.

The election of 69 MPs to Podemos and 40 to Ciudadanos (out of 350 deputies in the lower house) from none in the previous national election in 2011 are major breakthroughs but ones that were fully expected. Indeed the result for Ciudadanos was in comparison with opinion polls during the campaign the most disappointing of all four main national parties. One reason may be that polls seemed to be pointing towards a centre-right coalition of Ciudadanos and the PP. Some potential Ciudadanos supporters may have moved to other parties on the left because they did not want to prop up the PP.

As it is neither the two national parties of the centre-right nor the two national parties of the left, the PSOE and Podemos, can quite muster the 176 seats needed to hold a majority. The other parties are mainly regional ones, some of whom are on the left, others in the centre. However, because the PSOE and Podemos are more sympathetic to the ambitions of the regional parties (though not as far as wanting to concede outright independence to Catalonia or the Basque Country) they will probably support a left wing government enabling it to have a fragile majority.

 

Meeting the hopes of its voters will be an uphill struggle

Such an alliance might be portrayed as an anti-austerity coalition but if it tries to live up to such a name it will be wasting precious time. Investors in Spanish government paper have to be kept happy that the government will keep the deb from rising rapidly, otherwise they will charge higher interest rates leaving less available for other government expenditure or in extremis force the government to seek a full scale bail-out (they at present have limited support to help prop up illiquid savings banks) from the European Stability Fund (ESM), thus leading them from the frying pan of the need to keep investors happy to the fire of being told what to do by the Quadriga (the old Troika of IMF, European Central Bank and European Commission plus the ESM).

What the government may be able to do is to distribute the burden of austerity more fairly between the privileged on the one hand and the less privileged and public services on the other. That means higher taxes, and crucially a drive against tax avoidance and evasion. An exception should be made to the relatively small proportion of private wealth going into small and medium businesses. To successfully make significant moves to a more equal society while also promoting continued economic recovery, will require single-minded determination, skill, patience and the willingness of competing parties to work together. At the time of writing this looks a tall order, and the left can be sure that the PP will exploit any weakness or failures.

 

 

 

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>